My Research in Press


Bahattin Buyuksahin’s research on  energy markets’ financialisation and equity-commodity co-movements, with Michel Robe of the American University, was the focus of an article on Risk.net. The article discusses Buyuksahin and Robe’s research, summarizing their conclusion: "As commodities moved into the investment mainstream, their returns increasingly matched those of equities, particularly after 2008. Büyükşahin & Robe (2011) showed the correlation between S&P’s GSCI-Energy indexes and the S&P 500 equity index hovered between –0.37 and 0.38 before the demise of Lehman, and then rose quickly, staying almost always above 0.34 and rising to as high as 0.62 in the second half of 2010.”  View Full Article (6/3/12)


Bahattin Buyuksahin’s research on the role of speculators in crude oil prices, with Jeff Harris of the Syracuse University, was the focus of an article on Seeking Alpha.com. The article discusses Buyuksahin and Harris’ research, summarizing their conclusion: “They do not dispute a correlation between speculative activity and oil price – the participants in the oil futures market increased dramatically during the oil price spikes of 2007-8 - but they do not assume causation. They carry out tests of Granger causality, to test whether the number of participants in the futures market lead changes in oil price, and find that they do not. Instead, they find that the activity generally follows from price changes, suggesting herding, possibly increased volatility, but not necessarily upwards pressure. ” View Full Article (1/5/12)


Bahattin Buyuksahin’s research on the ‘fair price’ pronouncements and the market price of crude oil , with Michel Robe of the American University, Celso Brunetti of the Johns Hopkins University and Kirsten Soneson of the CFTC, was the focus of an article on energy.aol.com. The article discusses Buyuksahin and others' research, summarizing their conclusion: “Fair price pronouncements by OPEC officials are ineffective at influencing crude oil market movements. View Full Article (10/11/11)


Bahattin Buyuksahin’s research on  energy markets’ financialisation and equity-commodity co-movements, with Michel Robe of the American University, was mentioned in an article on FT.com. The article discusses Buyuksahin and Robe’s research, summarizing their conclusion: "Commodity futures became “financialised,” the correlation between returns in commodities and equities increased amid greater participation by speculators generally and hedge funds especially.”  View Full Article (8/30/11)


Bahattin Buyuksahin’s research  on financialisation of commodity markets and equity-commodity linkages, with Michel Robe of the American University, was mentioned in an article on Reuters.com. The newswire article discusses the impact of speculators on energy prices and suggests that: "Singleton builds on the work of Ke Tang (Renmin University), Wei Xiong (Princeton), Bahattin Buyuksahin (IEA), Michel Robe (American University) and Yiqun Mou (Columbia Business School) who have investigated links between investment and prices and challenged or modified the previous consensus.” View Full Article (6/20/11)


Bahattin Buyuksahin’s research on energy markets’ financialisation and equity-commodity co-movements, with Michel Robe of the American University, was the focus of an article on AllAboutAlpha.com, a strategic information service for the asset management and hedge fund industries. The article discusses Buyuksahin and Robe’s research, summarizing their conclusion: “Cross-correlation patterns appear to show that hedge funds involved in both equity and commodity futures markets play a big, bad role in causing energy market distortions, which in turn affects both the price of oil and the prices drivers pay at the pumps.” View Full Article (6/5/11)


Bahattin Buyuksahin’s presentation on the role of financial players on financialisation of commodities was mentioned in an article on usinenouvelle.com. The article discusses Buyuksahin's research, summarizing his conclusion: “Oil price volatility has increased sharply after 2006, but other commodities that are not traded in exchanges experienced similar fluctuations and price surges in the second part of 2000s. This might suggests that it is the mismatch between supply and demand has pushed up more than the arrival of financial investors.” View Full Article (5/11/11)


Bahattin Buyuksahin’s research on the role of speculators in crude oil prices, with Jeff Harris of the Syracuse University, was the focus of an article on Forbes.com. The article discusses Buyuksahin and Harris’ research, summarizing their conclusion: “Their findings undermine the claim that speculators' behavior increases gasoline prices.” View Full Article (4/19/11)


Bahattin Buyuksahin’s research on the ‘fair price’ pronouncements and the market price of crude oil, with Michel Robe of the American University, Celso Brunetti of the Johns Hopkins University and Kirsten Soneson of the CFTC, was the focus of an article on Reuters.com. The article discusses Buyuksahin and others' research, summarizing their conclusion: “Deeds rather rather than words are what matters.” View Full Article (12/17/10)


Bahattin Buyuksahin’s research on the role of speculators in commodity prices, with Celso Brunetti of the Johns Hopkins University, was the focus of an article on QuantMinds.com, a strategic information service dedicated to financial risk management, trend forecasting and data mining. The article discusses Buyuksahin and Brunetti’s research, summarizing their conclusion: “Their findings provide evidence that speculative trading in futures markets is NOT destabilizing. To the contrary, speculative trading activity reduces volatility levels.” View Full Article (7/8/10)


Bahattin Buyuksahin’s research on  equity-commodity co-movements, with Michel Robe of the American University and Michael Haigh of Societe Generale, was the focus of an article on HardAssetsInvestor.com, research-oriented Web site devoted to sharing ideas about hard assets investing. The article discusses Buyuksahin and others' research, summarizing their conclusion: “They provide ample evidence that shows the relationship between returns on commodities and equities has not changed significantly over the past 15 years.”  View Full Article (5/6/08).